Third Rail Eps 42: Airbnb in Central Brooklyn: Chaos or Community?

A recent article in Brooklyn Deep ran an exclusive on a study by Inside Airbnb, an Airbnb activist project that has been largely critical of the Airbnb enterprise.  The study concludes that Airbnb acts as a racial gentrification tool in New York City’s predominantly Black neighborhoods.

“Across all 72 predominantly Black New York City neighborhoods, Airbnb hosts are 5 times more likely to be white” writes Murray Cox, the author of the report, and the founder of the Inside Airbnb project.  Also, White hosts in Black neighborhoods  earned $159.7 million, the report estimates, while only $48.3 million went to Black hosts.”

Critics of Airbnb have claimed that their hosts are taking rentable apartments and rooms off the rental market and impacting affordable housing.

On the other hand, hosts and Airbnb representatives themselves contend that Airbnb helps New Yorkers make ends meet. Furthermore, they argue, it serves as anchor for a growing neighborhood based tourist economy that helps lift the entire neighborhood. What could be wrong?

Guests, Murray Cox, founder of Inside Airbnb and Jason Mondesir- Caesar, Brooklyn resident and AirBnB Super Host join us for a stimulating conversation.

Segment One: Who? What? Where? Why Airbnb?

The Third Rail crew explores how Airbnb is being used in Central Brooklyn.

Segment Two: Mark and Veralyn ask the question…

Is Airbnb a good or bad thing?

Segment Three: “Tell ‘Em Why You Mad”

An unexpected plot twist, dating in 2017, and being policed in Brooklyn.

Intro and Outro theme Music: “City Survival” by MC K-Swift featuring TreZure Empire.

Episode Music: Instrumental clips from “Divider” and “It’s Always Too Late to Start Over”  by Chris Zabriskie

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2 comments on “Third Rail Eps 42: Airbnb in Central Brooklyn: Chaos or Community?

  1. Great episode. I appreciate the different points of view on issue of home sharing. I hope that you will develop future podcasts that provide a variety of opinions on the political, social, cultural, and economic changes that impact Central Brooklyn.

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